The Fly Trap by Frederik Sjoberg, translated by Thomas Teal

Reading a book featuring an avid amateur entomology collector specializing in Hoverflies (also called flower flies) was not exactly at the top of my “to read” list, yet I was surprisingly entertained by Frederik Sjoberg’s rambling autobigraphical memoir The The Fly Trap. A best seller in his native Sweden (30,000 copies), over ten years later it has been beautifully translated into English by Thomas Teal for those interested readers in the United States as well as other countries. Ironically I had just finished The Girl in the Spider’s Web by David Langercrantz, another popular Swedish book (and a continuation of the original Millennium novels by Steig Larsson). Prior to that series, my last exposure to Swedish writing was Astrid Lindgren’s Pippi Longstocking. I guess I should seek out more authors from this country.

Sjoberg has a humorous style, especially considering the subject matter. Who knew that there were professionals who study flies and that there are specialties within this genre. While The Fly Trap mainly focused on Hoverflies, there are also numerous other species of flies (over 4424 species in Sweden, some which disguise themselves as bees) making entomology a complex scientific endeavor. Probably the best known entomologist is René Malaise (1892-1978) who invented the Malaise Fly Trap (the author purchases the mega version at 6 x 3 meters) capable of capturing a multitude of fly species for investigation. The author spends a good portion of the book exploring the life of his hero who was a pioneer in the field and put fly collecting on the map. Yes, people have been interested in flies for generations.

What appealed to me about The Fly Trap was the way the author expressed himself. His turn of a phrase has the potential to be breathtakingly lovely, such as “The high frequency hum of their wings is like a footnote that makes the experience all the richer for those who know the sound.” His enthusiasm towards flies was infectious, at times I even forgot how much I detest these pests. Why Hoverflies? They are “neither too many (202 species so far found on the island) or too few; neither too familiar nor too exotic”. Plus flies “allay anxiety . . . On top of which they’re free.”

Ultimately, the subject of flies is a take off point to discuss other topics. Of interest is the entire idea of collecting. Some people collect dolls or antiques or art work; Sjoberg mainly collects Hoverflies. Strindberg’s theory of Buttonology, the need to sort, store, and catalog a specific collection, was explored, as well as the question of why people are drawn to island life, and, of necessity for those who study insects, the concept of time – slowness vs speed in our daily lives.

Sjoberg is well read and includes many quotes from renowned and obscure authors who explore the themes in this book, especially ones dealing with his beloved flies.

Definitely worth a look see and, surprisingly, the author leaves us wanting more, so I’m looking forward to the next book in the saga. Four stars.

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