The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son on Life, Love, and Loss by Gloria Vanderbilt and Anderson Cooper

There are numerous books, photographs, articles and newsreels, along with “gossipy fairy telling” about Gloria Vanderbilt and the Vanderbilt family saga. This particular book approaches the topic from a different angle. Anderson Cooper, the son of Gloria Vanderbilt, begins to realize his mother is mortal after she develops respiratory problems at the age of ninety one. Looking back on his life, he realizes that his mother has never really talked about her childhood and young adult years and that much of his knowledge about his family legacy has been through media sources.

Keeping in mind that Anderson has a career with CNN which requires him to travel all over the world, it is lucky that Gloria is savvy enough to be able to correspond through emails. These interchanges become the basis of The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son on Life, Love, and Loss as a mother shares a retrospection of her life with her son, providing a give and take with explanations of past occurrences, many which happened prior to Cooper’s birth.

This format also gives Anderson a chance to ask questions and discover similarities and differences between their views of life. While Gloria is what one would call a free spirit, Anderson tends to be a type one personality searching for stability in a world full of chaos. While his mom thrives on mayhem, Cooper cringes at the thought. Life was far from tranquil after Anderson’s father, Wyatt Cooper, passed away during heart bypass surgery when he was only ten, so it is not surprising that he craved stability. Perhaps in a normal household that would have been a reasonable expectation but we are talking about Gloria Vanderbilt, a woman surrounded by wealth and prestige. Cooper’s life was far from ordinary with a nanny to take care of his needs while his mother ran her design empire. Yet Anderson decided at an early age to retain the name of his father and earn his worth through his own endeavors, not his heritage.

It’s amazing the depth of Gloria’s thoughts at the age of ninety one, looking back and trying to make sense of who she was, what she did, and why she felt compelled to choose the various paths her life took (or rather how she drifted from one situation to the next, seemingly at random, taking advantage of the opportunity of the moment). This in contrast to her son who instituted a life plan which he tries to follow. Of course, it’s easy to look backwards, after the deeds are done, to try and justify one’s actions. Despite all the pandemonium in her childhood, it is difficult to feel sorry for what some people call “the poor little rich girl” who lived in the lap of luxury yet yearned for love and affection from her socialite mother. Still, we all make choices and her admitted wildness at the age of seventeen is that of a headstrong teenager determined to have a good time on the social scene of Hollywood, not the fault of an absentee parent.

While some felt the back and forth of these notes between mother and son distracted from Gloria’s narration, they miss the purpose of this book. It is not a biography of Gloria Vanderbilt, especially since there are dozens of those containing more salacious tidbits, but a year’s worth of sharing between parent and child which we, as the reader, are privileged to view. A third voice gives the reader some background explanations including references to events which might be foreign to us. Perhaps these three separate voices could have been labeled, although Cooper’s responses are in bold and the narratives are in italics while Gloria’s musings are in a regular font. Many recommend the audiobook, narrated by the authors, which provides a more intimate voice.

If these interchanges peak an individual reader’s interest, there are plenty of sources to read which fill in the blanks about both Gloria and the entire Vanderbilt family. My main complaint is that the photographs sprinkled throughout the book are not labeled, nor are there enough of them. Greedy me, I wanted more. Three and half stars.

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