Crossfire by Dick Francis and Felix Francis

Where’s a man to go after having his leg blown off while serving his Queen and Country in Afghanistan? Once released from the hospital with a perfectly usable prosthesis (which clicks when he walks) Captain Tom Forsyth proceeds to the one place which he has avoided most of his adult life – his childhood home. It’s not that he doesn’t find comfort in the physical surroundings, it’s just that he and his mother always seem to get into a major altercation, nitpicking each other over minutia. It doesn’t help that he blames his mother for her failed marriage to his absentee father and her remarriage to his stepdad.

Yet Tom needs some sort of roof over his head, so home he goes – to the house and stables belonging to the renowned trainer of supreme racehorses – his mom, Josephine Kauri, also known as the First Lady of British Racing. Once you hear the word “racing”, the reader knows they are in “Francis Land”. Crossfire (loosely referring to the movement of a horse who counter canters during a race as well as to the outcome of being caught between the action of two firearms ) is the last novel written by Dick Francis with his son Felix.

It doesn’t take long for Tom to realize that something is wrong in his childhood domicile. With a lot of prying and a bit of curious snooping, he discovers his mom is behind in her taxes, has lost a shitload of money in a shady investment, and is being blackmailed to the tune of 2000 pounds a week, as well as being forced to lose certain races.

Through a series of fortuitous events as well as some clever surveillance, Tom is able to discover the source(s) of his mother’s possible downfall including the potential loss of her reputation (more important to her than money) as well as resolve a childhood crush, and find a focus for his uncertain future.

Well written with lots of action and intrigue as well as some LOL humor, this is a definite book to add to your must read list.

While I read Crossfire when it first came out, this time I listened to the CD and Martin Jarvis does a superb job of bringing the story to life. While some might contend that this title doesn’t meet the standards set by Francis’ previous books, I would like to argue that Crossfire has all the components of a great read – compelling characters, an exciting plot, an unforeseen resolution, all told with a light humorous touch. Add in the horses and it just doesn’t get any better.

Five stars!

This review also appears on Goodreads.

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