Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor

I hated (in a good way) this book about two teenagers who develop a common bond while picking up some Zoloft at the local pharmacy to help relieve their symptoms of clinical depression. Reggie (see: Regina Mason) refuses to feel anything after the loss of her two closest friends while Snake (see: Matthew Elliot) is dealing with the after effects of inadvertently impregnating fellow classmate Clara Banks whose father owns the ice cream joint where they all work. This impending fatherhood puts a crimp in any sort of relationship these two lost souls might cultivate even though they both exhibit a growing attraction (see: bearability) towards one another. Who else recognizes the various phases of depression, especially when the wicked Stage 3 (see: Disconnect) immobilizes the sufferer? Clara, while she wants her boyfriend to love her, recognizes that there is an irresistible allure between Snake and Reggie, despite his sense of loyalty towards her and the baby. The triangle becomes even more bizarre when Clara turns to Reggie to be her partner in birthing class when Snake, in the grips of the paralyzing Stage 3, stands her up, resulting in an atypical alliance amongst the three outcasts.

Add in a droll, provocative, sometimes hurtful dialogue, a bunch of compelling minor characters (Side note: Snake’s two moms), and some intense psychological musings with a morbid overtone to convey the premise for Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor.

The fast moving plot covering only a couple months of their junior year in a small town high school moves from point A to point D with more than a few intersections of various disasters (see: self inflicted) encountered along the way. While there is a somewhat HEA at the conclusion, the future is realistically open ended concerning the destiny for these young teens.

Four stars for a unique approach to examining the issue of deep depression and family dynamics as well as dealing with the topic of rejection by ones peers, not to mention the repercussions of teen pregnancy,

A thank you to Netgalley and Houghton Mifflin for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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