Tag Archives: Miscarriage

The Stars Are Fire by Anita Shreve

When we talk today about women’s rights we fail to remember that it wasn’t until 1920 that women were allowed to vote in the United States and it has only been in the last forty or so years that women could get their own credit cards or purchase property without a male consigner. Consider that the ERA has never been ratified into law and our country has been unsuccessful in voting a woman into office as President, but still wives have a lot more rights today than they did in the late 1940s and 1950s.

The role of women in 1947 is an underlying theme throughout The Stars Are Fire by Anita Shreve. Grace Holland is a dutiful wife whose life evolves around her husband Gene and her two young children. She doesn’t work or drive, relying on Gene to provide for the family. His will dominates their lives, but their amiable chatter in the evenings plus her friends in the community, especially her next door neighbor Rosie, are enough to keep Grace content with her lot in life. At twenty three she’s a little confused about their lackluster sex life, wondering why she must lie face down in an uncomfortable position, but the act is over quickly and her husband’s needs must be met (a part of her wifely duty). After an especially rough session, Grace is unsure if she should be grateful for his sudden indifference, but the less he touches her, the less he communicates. Then when one night, after he fails to “perform” despite her assuming the preferred position, Gene becomes taciturn and aloof, withdrawing any of the little bit of affection previously expressed.

When “The Fire” begins in their area, after a summer of drought, the community hopes it won’t come so close to the ocean, but despite their preparations, when the alarm is given they barely have time to escape. Rosie and Grace grab their children and head for the ocean, taking refuge in the water protecting the little ones under their bodies. Rosie is rescued first, but by the time help comes for Grace she is suffering from hypothermia. Kindhearted strangers provide assistance as Grave recuperates at the hospital. Her husband, out fighting the fire, does not return, so Grace finds herself relying on others until she can find a way to take up the mantle as provider. Deciding to move into her deceased mother-in-law’s vacant home (well almost vacant) and with the help of her mother, she restarts her life. The squatter, a brilliant pianist, stays for awhile to help out, and Grace discovers a new identity along with a true sense of contentment which was formerly missing in her life. Taking advantage of some of the conveniences of the large Victorian House, a home where she was never made to feel welcome, Grace finds a way to survive after losing everything. Of course, when things start to go wrong, she has some serious decisions to make, weighing a sense of duty against the loss of any semblance of her new found liberty.

The author creates a story based on a true disaster, an October fire which wiped out parts of Maine from Bar Harbor to Kittery. Grace’s tale also reflects the era prior to the bra burning days where women demanded equal rights. Gene reflects the attitude men had towards their wives who were considered more like domestic servants (with benefits) than spouses. Since Gene was a laudable provider who did not beat his wife and even helped out a bit around the house, he would have been considered a commendable husband (despite his lack of ardor in the bedroom). When I hear people lament about the good old days, meaning the 1950s, they often don’t realize it was a time of inequality, not just for minorities, but for women. (Or maybe they do!). I liked the fact that Grace was able to reinvent herself after that terrible experience. As a mother of four I empathized with her frantic actions and as a grandmother I rejoiced that her mother was right there for her, providing the support she needed. Almost a child herself, Grace certainly had a full plate.

Well written, fast paced, with just enough action to keep our interest, and a starring role for the crazy weather, I particularly enjoyed the culmination (even though I was secretly anticipating these very actions) with everybody getting exactly what they deserved.

Four stars and a thank you to Netgalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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The Art of Losing Yourself by Katie Ganshert

If you enjoy Christian books with a capital C, then you might like The Art of Losing Yourself by Katie Ganshert, but don’t expect a squeaky clean story. This novel deals with issues such as alcoholism, failed relationships, sex before marriage, teen drinking and drug use, and swearing. Yet interspersed between these “sinful” behaviors are various scriptures and reflections about God and Jesus (which at times become a bit preachy). It’s easy to see why the main characters have doubts about their religion when they can relate better to the Book of Job than to the Gospels.

Two estranged half sisters end up together battling their personal demons. Carmen, a successful meteorologist on a local news channel, is numbed by her inability to have a child, lashing out while keeping her distance from a loving but clueless husband. Gracie is compulsive in her actions reflecting her anger at the world, but she gets a fresh start at a new high school and even begins to make friends despite her negative attitude.

Yet life is not fair and this is definitely not a fairy tale as even simple solutions are unattainable. Despite the hard work and dedication towards setting things right, more often than not failure is the result. Watching the hypocritical achieve their desired outcomes without a struggle, the sisters each wonder about God and why he doesn’t seem to be there for them.

A series of “coincidences” leads one sister to save the life of the other, but there is no resolution to their dilemmas, just more questions.

Three stars for an interesting, though depressing read.

Thank you to Netgalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This review also appears on Goodreads.

A Whisper of Desire by Bronwen Evans (Disgraced Lord Series, Book 4)

Despite the contentious, destructive marriage of her now deceased parents, Lady Marissa Hawkstone, who once rejected true love, decides to seek it out after she sees the loving relationship her brother Sebastian, the Marquis of Coldstone, has with his new wife Beatrice. As her first season comes to a close, everyone anticipates her engagement to the attentive Lord Rutherford, but he is secretly only attracted to her dowry and an increased allowance from his father. Maitland Spencer, the fifth Duke of Lyttelton and one of the six Libertine Scholars accidentally overhears the cad bragging about his real motivations while making love to his mistress.

At one point Maitland considered Marisa as a possible mate, but his randy feelings towards her scares him off. Yet the choice is taken from him when at the same ball the two are drugged and end up naked together in one of the bedrooms in Lord Dunmire’s house. The Duke does the honorable thing and marries his best friend’s sister.

Maitland, also known as the Cold Duke, lives a very regimented life, especially in regards to his sexual relations which he only allows to occur once every three days. In this way he can keep his passions under control so he doesn’t end up like his deceased disease ridden monstrous father who resorted to rape in order to satisfy his needs. Unfortunately, Marisa, although a virgin, is not such an innocent having witnessed various acts by her rakish brother. While Maitland is content to leave his new bride alone on their wedding night, Marisa has other ideas and enters his room to seduce him into his husbandry duty. Maitland’s lustful reaction to her beauty horrifies him and the Duke vows to ignore her charms until an appropriate amount of time has passed. She doesn’t understand why he rejects her advances and thinks there must be something wrong with her. Both seek Sebastian for advice, although the Marquis feels uncomfortable discussing his sister’s sex life.

How the two come to terms with married life is complicated by the continued search for the woman seeking to destroy the lives of the six friends. While the villainess has been ultimately unsuccessful in the first three volumes of the Disgraced Lord Series, she is happy with her results in book four, A Whisper of Desire, envisioning further revenge against the two remaining bachelors.

If book one had too few plot details, this story is jammed full of twists and turns. Of the books thus far, this one really dwells on the seedier sides of life, and includes erotica usually reserved for a different genre. On the plus side, the reader gets to discover more about the six Libertine Scholars and their spouses as well as being introduced to some new characters who will play a role in future novels in the series. However, this book is not a happily ever after Regency Romance since it includes some unfortunate heart wretching events which threaten to mar the lives of those involved.

Despite the chock full plot, the author Bronwen Evans still has a tendency to repeat her message, first through thoughts then through repeated explanations to other characters. She also continues to gloss over the reality of the Regency era with modern dialogue and opinions which don’t fit the times. Not only are some of the events over the top, there is simply too much action for one book and it gets a bit overwhelming at times. Yet, despite the flaws, I think this is the best book so far. While the reader usually is safe in believing “alls well that ends well”, Evans leaves us with some doubts as to whether all the friends will survive through the end of the series. Three and a half stars.

Thank you to Netgalley and Loveswept for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.