Tag Archives: Relationships

The Marquis and I (The Worthington, 4) by Ella Quinn

Lady Charlotte Carpenter has been kidnapped. She’s not worried, since she and her sister have taken lessons on self protection plus she has a gun in her basket (along with her docile traveling cat). If only she could get the lock picked in time to escape. In the meantime, her abduction has been witnessed and the butler has cornered Constantine, the Marquis of Kenilworth, into going to the rescue as none of the men of the house are in the vicinity. Despite the inconvenience, Con’s chiverous upbringing necessitates he help this damsel in distress. Then there’s the young groomsman Jemmy, hitching a ride on the back of the coach, ready to assist in the rescue. Miss Betsy, a villain from previous books in The Worthington series, has convinced the innkeepers that the girls she sends their way are runaways needing to be reunited with their loved ones (actually paying customers who desire a particular woman). Constantine is able to rescue Charlotte, but somehow word gets out that they’ve been alone together and without a chaperone to vouch for their innocence, Con must marry his rescuee in order to save her from ruin. Charlotte, however, doesn’t want anything to do with the handsome Con who keeps bad company and has a mistress. Despite their public betrothal, she leads him on a merry chase, even allowing another suitor to publicly court her. Through a convoluted series of events, including a second revenge abduction, the two develop a mutual love and respect for each other and find the same happiness bequeathed on other members of the Worthington family.

While there was a good story somewhere in the Marquis and I by Ella Quinn, there was just too much busyness in a plot that seemed to drag on. The repetitive, mundane dialogue became annoying, despite the delightful characters (mainly the multitude of Charlotte’s younger brothers and sisters with their pets). The sexual encounter between the betrothed couple lacked the amorous touch although the experience made them want to move the wedding date forward. Charlotte’s insistence that she couldn’t marry Con because he had a mistress (even after he broke off that relationship and helped his former paramour restart a new life) and her other pigheaded attitudes made her the least likeable of all the Worthingtons and Constantine, despite his rowdy background, was rather docile through the entire story, especially considering all the crap thrown his way (although the little ones glommed onto him). While I usually read these Regency Romances quickly, this one dragged so much I had to force myself to pick up this book on more than one occasion. A plus was the inclusion of characters from previous books in The Worthington series and even some names from the The Marriage Game. If you’ve read through the majority of these publications, you’ll be familiar with many of the members of The Ton, from the memorable busybody, Lady Belamny, to the sought after dressmaker, Madame Lissette.

Still, shame on you, Ella Quinn. Next time take more care and edit your work into a more readable format and spice up that dialogue (and the sex). Two and a half stars and a thank you to Netgalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, translated by Henning Koch

This book made me cry.

“People said Ove saw the world in black and white. But she was color. All the color he had.” And that was enough!

Fredrik Backman has created a truly eccentric personality in main character Ove, a grumpy malcontent with a big heart underneath who’s a stickler for the rules (as he conceives them) but grudgingly lends a hand (actually he takes over) to make sure the job is done right.

Despite the way Ove views the world, or maybe because of it, you kind of have to love this guy even wth his negative attitudes towards almost everything, except his wife who he dearly loves, (although he also has a soft spot for the Saab he drives). Fate in all its glory, both the good and the bad, keeps dictating Ove’s path, interceding when it seems like there’s no way forward. Not too long, (336 pages), A Man Called Ove is a mesmerizing read, one of those can’t put it down books which instantly peaks your interest. I really can’t say too much more or I’ll spoil the “fun” as you discover the whats and whys on your own.

The translation from the original Swedish can be jarring at times (I’m not a fan of first person narration), but there are some clever phrases that will bring a smile to your face and even an occasional laugh. My only complaint is that Ove acted older than his fifty nine years, but then again, he was born an old man. This one has been on my “To Read List” for awhile and it did not disappoint. I can see why A Man Called Ove was a New York Times Bestseller for almost a year – a perfect choice for a movie (made in Sweden in 2015). Five stars. Enjoy!

The greatest compliment : May I be “unlike you in the smallest number of ways”.

If You Give a Man a Cookie: A Parady by Laura Joffe Numeroff, illustrated by Duane Ajhar

Who better to write a take off on the well known children’s book, If You Give A Mouse A Cookie, than the original author Laura Joffe Numeroff, and she doesn’t disappoint with her new picture book, If You Give A Man A Cookie: A Parody. The 32 pages of tongue in cheek stereotypical behaviors Is perfect for those who have a sense of humor and love all things absurd. Of course, if a man wants a cookie, he’ll also need some milk and when he’s done he’ll simply put the empty milk carton back in the fridge and so on. The illustrator is Duane Ajhar who has created these comical adult oriented caricatures (as compared to the original artist Felicia Bond’s whimsical drawings meant for children). Of note is the man’s companion, a dog, whose antics are included in the story. Unfortunately, the jocularity is a little advanced for most small children, as this publication is geared towards a more mature crowd. While perfect as a bridal shower or gag gift, I don’t see a huge audience for this title, and some men (or even women) might find it a tad offensive, especially when Numeroff suggests the man “drag his sorry ass out of bed and get it himself”. What fun!

Four stars and a thank you to Netgalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

The Art of Losing Yourself by Katie Ganshert

If you enjoy Christian books with a capital C, then you might like The Art of Losing Yourself by Katie Ganshert, but don’t expect a squeaky clean story. This novel deals with issues such as alcoholism, failed relationships, sex before marriage, teen drinking and drug use, and swearing. Yet interspersed between these “sinful” behaviors are various scriptures and reflections about God and Jesus (which at times become a bit preachy). It’s easy to see why the main characters have doubts about their religion when they can relate better to the Book of Job than to the Gospels.

Two estranged half sisters end up together battling their personal demons. Carmen, a successful meteorologist on a local news channel, is numbed by her inability to have a child, lashing out while keeping her distance from a loving but clueless husband. Gracie is compulsive in her actions reflecting her anger at the world, but she gets a fresh start at a new high school and even begins to make friends despite her negative attitude.

Yet life is not fair and this is definitely not a fairy tale as even simple solutions are unattainable. Despite the hard work and dedication towards setting things right, more often than not failure is the result. Watching the hypocritical achieve their desired outcomes without a struggle, the sisters each wonder about God and why he doesn’t seem to be there for them.

A series of “coincidences” leads one sister to save the life of the other, but there is no resolution to their dilemmas, just more questions.

Three stars for an interesting, though depressing read.

Thank you to Netgalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This review also appears on Goodreads.