Tag Archives: witch

The Antidote by Shelley Sackier

Fee (Ophelia) lived a charmed life as a child playing with her two favorite people, brothers Prince Rye and Prince Xavi. Then an invasive deadly illness overtakes the kingdom and Rye is shipped off to another land while the new Royal Highness Xavi (set to be coronated once he reaches the age of twenty one) stays behind to learn the ropes assisted by Sir Rollins and the Council. Fee is chosen to learn how to be a healer, studying the flora and mixing various herbal potions to serve the few remaining citizens of Fireli. The rest of the children have been transported to one of the other three realms until the ten year quarantine is lifted. Fee, who must stay hidden from view, only has contact with her best friend, sneaking out at night to spend some precious time away from the scrutiny of the dour Savva who is so critical of her work. Everyone must continue using the antidote to keep them healthy, with a special blend for the two “youngsters”.  Ten years later, Fee, now seventeen, is just biding her time until Rye returns and they can fulfill the marriage contract created by their now deceased parents. Yet the closer they get to the date when they can all reunite, the sicker Xavi becomes, making her fear he won’t make it to his twenty first birthday. Can she use her affinity with the plant world to work her magic and save her best friend? Will Rye forgive her if she fails and his brother dies. Reluctant, but desperate, she asks for help from Savva which leads to a series of unexpected events and secrets which provide answers for questions Fee didn’t know enough to ask.

In The Antidote by Shelley Sackier, the reader is also left in the dark, often not really understanding what is going on or why certain dynamics are important. Slowly they get to understand what is occurring as Fee’s eyes are opened to her destiny. While some of the revelations result in “AHA” moments, Sackier should have given us a bit more background to avoid the confusion. Yes, I appreciate the need for suspense, but if the reader can’t be engaged from the beginning, they just might decide to read a more mentally amenable book. Which would be a shame, because I just loved Fee, Rye, and Xavi, wholesome and well meaning characters whose hearts are in the right place despite their privileged place in society – primitive though it might be (sounding like a tale from the Middle Ages feudal era). Within the pages are lessons on good vs evil and the circumstances which motivate individuals to make questionable choices which benefit themselves to the detriment of others. Moral issues perfect for the YA audience.

However, even upon completing this book, I still had numerous questions about the whys and wherefores which the plot did not fully explain.

Three and a half stars and a thank you to Edelweiss for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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Belle’s Tale (Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, #1) and The Beast’s Tale (Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, #2) adapted by Mallory Reaves, illustrated by Studio Dice

When I was ten years old I became obsessed with fairy tales, visiting the public library and perusing as many books as I could find that were filled with tons of these stories from the past. One of my favorites was Beauty and the Beast, originally created by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve in 1740. However, the version I knew was adapted in 1889 by Andrew Lang in the Blue Fairy Book. The universal theme of finding love by uncovering the beauty within a person despite their outward appearance or misguided actions is appealing to all story tellers, so it’s not surprising that this is one tale that has gone through numerous reinventions over the years appearing in formats ranging from stage to screen to television to animation to written word and now – Manga style.

While I love Disney, in recent years their adaptations of many well known fairy tales only retain a teeny essence of the original such as Frozen (doesn’t even slightly resemble The Snow Queen), Tangled (well she did have really long hair), or The Princess and the Frog (not even close). However, many aspects of Disney’s animated Beauty and the Beast actually took components from the original, especially if you leave out that whole Gaston bit. While I haven’t seen the new live action Disney Movie, it is my understanding that several details were added to flesh out the story which at least have a footing in the French version.

Along with the artistic talents of Studio Dice, Mallory Reaves has created a manga graphic novel based on this movie. In order to provide some depth and present the points of view of both main charactors, Tokyo Pop has published twin companion books, Belle’s Tale: (Disney’s Beauty and and the Beast, #1) and The Beast’s Tale: (Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, #2). Their challenge was to retain the essence of the Disney renditions utilizing the Shojo Manga style which was beautifully accomplished with the location pieces superbly rich with details using line drawings to recreate various rooms in the castle and other locales. My favorite was the vast library which the Beast presents to Belle as her own. While it is difficult to capture all the nuances of a movie in a one dimensional drawing, the artist made a valiant attempt, helped along with our familiarity with the animation, stage, and movie versions so many of us have seen over the years.

As far as the plot is concerned, Belle’s point of view will be the most familiar to the readers, but the Beast’s tale is definitely a companion piece meant to be read in conjunction with the first. While Belle’s story could easily stand alone, too much is missing from the book featuring the Beast’s perceptions, despite the duplication of many panels. Yet I found it fascinating to listen in to the Beast’s thoughts and reactions as he experienced the same events as Belle, helping the reader undergo his transformation from Beast to man in a way which makes us root all the more for true love. While there are a few “holes” in both stories, the manga style necessitates brevity over explanation forcing the reader to interject their own aesthetics into the saga. It was clever how the artists were able to differentiate the character’s thoughts from the dialogue.

Both books contained several pages of concept art at the conclusion of the story.

A thank you to Netgalley and Tokyo Pop for providing this ARC in the exchange for an honest review. Four stars. This review also appears on my blog, Gotta Read.

Diary of Anna the Girl Witch: Foundling Witch by Max Candee, illustrated by Raquel Barros

Of all the genres, the one which is the most difficult to master is the creation of a satisfying children’s book. Unfortunately, Max Candee, the Swedish author, has not quite found that sweet spot of success with his book, The Diary of Anna the Girl Witch: Foundling Witch. It’s not that his story is lacking since I enjoyed the engaging tale of the orphan Anna discovered as ammbabe amongst the Bears in Siberia by a kindly fur trapper. Upon reaching the age of six, her Uncle Mischa brings her to an orphanage in Switzerland and the story opens at the private boarding school which Anna attends due to a generous trust fund (gotta love those Swiss Bank accounts) that will provide her with the financial security necessary to support her on any quest which crosses her path. Add in some evil doers and the fact Anna has special powers, and you potentially have the start of something great.

The issue then is the delivery. Candee decided to create a book which is part diary, part first person narrative using simple text which doesn’t fit the age of the characters. Anna is an intelligent thirteen, not eight or even ten. In addition, children have become quite sophisticated in their reading material, note another book about witchcraft – Rowling’s Harry Potter series – which is a lot darker and more sophisticated than this story. Or examine the higher level of text in the malicious Series of Unfortunate Events. So the question is: “Who is the audience?” Not YA or even middle school, but perhaps those in the elementary grades (yet not too young). Despite the numerous kid friendly illustrations by Spanish artist Raquel Barros, which are a huge positive for this publication, this is definitely not a picture book.

Yet I’m sure this new series would please the average child especially if it were presented in a different format. Do away with the diary and narration, taking the exact same story, and change it into a graphic novel. Viola! Perfecto! The possibilities are endless. Barros is more than capable of extending her delightful drawings into a pictorial description of Anna’s adventures. The author has the imagination and talents to redraft this saga into something quite exceptional. Graphic novels are also a popular emerging genre, especially those written specifically for children, having already been embraced by middle and high school students. The Anna the Girl Witch series could be one of those ground breaking books which would delight a much broader audience.

Problem solved. So when Anna receives the bizarre gifts from her unknown mother on her thirteenth birthday and slowly discovers she is a witch with an affinity for the moon, we will visually experience her awe and power as she fights the lurking evil which threatens her friends at the school she attends. A female teen protagonist who saves the day is just the sort of role model young girls need to read about as a means of their own empowerment.

So there it is. Right story, great illustrations, wrong format.

A thank you to Netgalley and Helvetic House for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Two and a half stars.

This review also appears on Goodreads.

The Witch of Painted Sorrow by M.J. Rose

In The Witch of Painted Sorrow by M.J. Rose, the reader is drawn into the cultural world of 1890’s Belle Époque Paris filled with the romance of the sight, sounds, and language inherent to this time and place. Sandrine Salome has fled her self centered husband in New York City who has driven her beloved father to suicide through his embezzlement from the bank they jointly managed. Sandrine turns to the only place of refuge open to her, the home of her grandmother, Eva Verlaine also known as L’Incendie or The Fire, a celebrated courtesan living at Maison de la Lune. To her horror, the lavish house is dark and devoid of human life. Luckily a neighbor brings her to her grand-mere’s new location, a short distance away. While Sandrine is led to believe that the mansion is closed for renovations, the elegant house is really being inventoried and readied to become the Museum of the Grand Horizontals. Although Eva loves Sandrine, she is horrified at the turn of events and encourages her grand-daughter to return home to her husband Benjamin. Sandrine has no intention of returning to a loveless marriage and feels drawn to her ancestral home where she spends more and more of her time, especially when she discovers the charismatic, handsome curator and architect, Julien, who is inventorying the vast collection of artifacts. Sandrine fears she is as frigid as her husband claims, but discovers she does have a passionate side, both in love and in art. This must have been an inherited talent passed on through the generations, unless it is as her grandmother fears, a ghostly interference by La Lune who is capable of invading the soul of the women in the Verlaine family. Grandmother warns, “For the women in our family, love is a curse, not a blessing.” La Lune feeds on strong emotions, especially the erotic, but Sandrine throws caution to the wind, enjoying her new found freedom as a woman. Her life centers around being an artist and a lover as she immerses herself into the Parisian culture of the bohemian crowd.

M.J. Rose weaves an intricate tale. Her detailed back drop makes Paris comes alive and we don’t blame Sandrine for wanting to take advantage of the opportunities, even if her normally timid personality is overcome by an invading spirit. Of course, La Lune does more than direct Sandrine’s life. Tragedy also paves the way for the ever selfish diva to burrow deeper into her host’s soul. The loving grandmother must be punished for her interference. Others as well feel the results of La Lune’s wrath.

As in all Gothic novels, at times you must suspend your belief and accept the surreal. So, while the story seems a bit far fetched, despite the supernatural theme, it is still an enjoyable read (just don’t look too closely at all the details). Even though there is quite a bit of action within the story, a lot of the narrative consists of Sandrine’s introspection as her desires are awoken. She fears her grandmother is right about the danger of becoming possessed and wonders if her new behaviors come from within or is she reflecting the nature of La Lune. Yet, Sandrine is enjoying life too much to want this experience to stop. My main criticism is that too much time is spent on these repetitive thoughts. I would have liked to have seen more action or a better development of the plot and minor characters. Also, the author tends to go to extremes where the tragedies are just a little too tragic. The husband is made out to be a bigger villain than he really is – not abusive, just an inconsiderate lover. While he brought dishonor through his actions to her father, was he truly a murderer? Then again, when evil is in the heart, who knows how it will be expressed. While Sandrine’s initial reactions to Benjamin seem to be misplaced (as if her life were in danger), perhaps it was her newly discovered personal freedom which she wanted to keep from his grasp. The mores of the times are forever in the background, where women had limited rights in a male dominated world. This puts Sandrine’s outrageous behaviors into greater perspective. Since this is the first of a series, the ending, by necessity, had to be open ended enough for the sequel, but I felt the conclusion was satisfying.

My advice is to read at least the first hundred pages or so before judging the book. Once the stage is set, the pace picks up as Sandrine explores her expanding universe, including Parisian Night Life and the occult, as she sets out to break down barriers. Three and a half stars.

A thank you to Atria and Netgalley for allowing me to read a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.